Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Dads With Swag
Dads With Swag

Episode · 2 years ago

Brett Farmiloe

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Sean sits down in studio  with a rad ass Dad Brett. They talk all things kids, work, Pillow fights and of course family.   The Date Dr Girl About Town

You are now about to witness the strength of street knowledge. You're listening to dad's with swag will. Your coach Shawn has the tools to help you navigate some of life's ups and downs. Let's do it. Whether you're trying to balance work in life, going through a difficult time in marriage or trying to manifest that perfect mate, Shawn can get you from where you are to where you want to be. Loving husband and Dadda two amazing girls. Your coach Shunk can help you Trin your dreams into goals and make them a reality. No more facing change. Is kind of start making change with the swaggy's data them all. Your coach, Seawan. What is welcome back to another episode at Dad's with Swag. We're coming at you live from the swagist studios of all the dad's with Swag Studio. I have a special guest live and in studio today, Brett farmlow, CEO of marketers. What's up, Brett? How you doing? Hey, what's going on? Hey, good to have you in studio. Take a couple minutes. Tell us a little bit about yourself, your family and like that. Sure data. Three husband and one from Santa Rosa, California, living in Scotts stale for just about half my life now. So it's been about eighteen years. And somma county, seventeen years. And Arizona. And Yeah, like you said, CEO Marketers, which is a SEO Company for small business. Perfect. Perfect. So from the bay to Arizona I'm the same thing. I came from San Francisco. Now I'm forged to got the orange and black. Yeah, orange and giants colors, my warriors blanket, my niners flag hanging outside. Yeah, I still represent the bay hard every day. And now, yeah, now I'm, I guess, here in Arizona Fall Right. So tell us a little about the family. Wife and kids? Yeah, sure, two sons and a daughter. Son is seven years old. Daughters for sons one. And my wife and I've been married for about seven years us and have been a minivan owner for about one year now. So not join that club. There's another guy from the bay. Shoot, I can't think of his name off the top of my head. I'm going to have to Google it at a break or something, but he basically takes mini vans and like soups him up. I'm talking like one, one hundred horsepower minivans and it's pretty cool and it's all with like different technology and stuff like that. I'm up to Google his name. I can't remember what his name is right now. It's a it's a different type of name, but he's done all kinds of shows like on Netflix and stuff like that. He's been in all these different competitions. That's pretty cool. He just takes like the scientific aspect of it all and like just throw rose down mad horse power. I mean, I don't want this whole episode to be about mini vans, but I will just say that, like any technology, with the minivan makes your life so much easier, like when I press a button and the kids just magically jump in, or when you drop that DVD player and they just like start staring. It's when Dad's need that. It's funny, like mini vans get such a bad rapp but they're really very, very, like useful for a family. Like typically, you know, you got the two seats where the kids can just walk straight back to the BAG, so they're not like jumping over yea, happen to get its love, it full down seeds. Parents love it. Yeah, it's like here's the thing. No one else loves it. Like if you start talking about your minivan Iveryrun's like now I've had like the Dad Dad's get it, though. I've had a once. You have like the challenges of like lifting up strollers into the back of the SUV or trying to, you know, client stand up high and get a car seat latched in. You get tired of it. Like it's better to have that low profile, big, wide open side doors, both right and left, like it's also empowering for kids, like they could stand up and they're just like yeah, like they feel they feel feel like a boss. Yeah, exactly, exactly. Well, I got to do is throw some rims in a wrap on that. So you did a Ted Talk. Tell us a little bit the the interesting that. The thing that stood out to me the most was the eighty eight thousand hours I'm going to work in my life. Well, yeah, it's a long time. Thanks for the rights. That's a big number. And what what made you decide to do a TEDX talk? Would you know how kind of how did that go? Howd that to be about? Let Yeah, let me give you some some background on it and just kind of feedback to your last question. My Story. So when I was graduating in school, I was in the county major, went to University of Arizona and Senior Year College, but my first suit was doing all these on campus interviews and sitting and waiting rooms and you're kind of like looking around at all...

...these other people and you're like what are you interviewing for? And no one really knows what they're going to do with their life, like pretty much any time in life, but especially at college graduations. So I decided to essentially continue interviewing people about the career paths for college students to look at essentially of how people got to where they are, and so I documented all of these career path stories on a website for people to look at and in order to gather these interviews, went across the country twice in our V's interviewing people about the career path. So we did about four hundred interviews over the course of two summers. Went everywhere, all up and down the country, you know, through the West Coast to the east coast and to the south, and documented these career stories. And so that's what the TEDX talk was about. Was essentially what are the commonalities of people who are successful in their careers and you know, like you said, working those eighty eight thousand hours in the lifetime and that's a hell of a lot of time to spend and you better spend it in enjoyment, right. Yeah, yeah, better do something you love. So one of the things you talked about was passion and doing something that you're passionate about. What are you passionate about with marketers? Yeah, small business, I would say, and creating a great workplace. So there's two stats that really inspire me on the daily one is that eighty percent of small businesses go out of business within the first five years, which to me is like really just a symptom of Hey, we've got this great idea and this great concept, but we just can't connect it to enough people who are willing to pay for it. And so that's what marketers does, is we connect small businesses with customers through search engine optimization so that we can kind of reverse that stat so that's one thing that really inspires me. And then the second thing is gallop has a survey that comes out year after year and it doesn't really change, and that's that seventy percent of the American workforce dislikes what they do for a living. So majority people go to work every single day and a lot of them are actively disengaged, a lot of them are just like passively engaged, and so to me, like that's a huge opportunity. You have potential, right. And so with marketers and like what I do on the daily and of growing a company is really catered towards that set of like can we create a great workplace that people really enjoy coming to us? Of that so that we can impact that stat because, you know, before that I was speaking and I was, you know, going around the country speaking about these road chips and you know, I don't really think it made to grid of an impact, like maybe it made an impact in that moment, but to have something that could have, something with long Chevity, like you have to create a company, you have to have something that's sustainable like that. Yeah, definitely. I was just talking to a good friend of mine, a dad of two, and he was having the same challenge. Like he has this great corporate job and you know, he's slowly moved up and this, that and the other thing and makes great money, but he's not passionate about it. He's happy, but not passionate and he likes to pay. He's you know, definitely doesn't like the company as much as he when he started, and he's not, you know, just basically boils down to passion. He's just not passionate about that job anymore and it it. You can see it like in his eyes and his demeanor and his posture. Like I'm like, you know, man, how's work going? And it's just like, you know, like, Whoa Dude, the money must be great to like have to deal, you know, with that. I don't know if there would be. It would have to be like a huge chunk of money for me to have to like, every time someone asked me about what I do, to just like falling down. Yeah, it does not bode well. You know. It's crazy, though, like just thinking about your audience a little bit and how how difficult it is, as life goes on, to like really do something that you're passionate about, like especially when you have kids, and like how great of a risk that is, like to go and pursue your passion is something that gets thrown out quite a bit and like when you got a couple kids or a family, and that's a big deal, you know. So, like I totally sympathize with with that situation because, yeah, it's risky and it's hard and, like you and like you, got to start as early as possible to get yourself in that situation where you're like okay, like I'm building something, and then that risk isn't as great to actually take. Yeah, because it's like what are you going to really do? You know, make sure you save enough money so you can like pay the mortgage in the school tuitions, and then this that you know said's up. Yeah, answer a year. You know, you're probably working like ten years to save up that year of you know, capital to be to say, all right, now I'm going to go figure out what I'm passionate about. And then it's like okay, now I got to raise the capital to build it or to do it or and your passion is going to switch a little bit too. Write like all of all of a sudden that becomes not about so much your personal passion and your job. It's...

...like all right, you know, you're very passionate about your kids or your family and like creating these great experiences for everyone. So, yeah, it's it's easy to get caught up. Yeah, and the things that are important. Like I know for me, anytime I look at like a new business opportunity or a new venture, first thing I look at is how much time is it going to take me out of my house, how much time is it going to take me away from my family, because those things to me are nonnegotiable pulls. Like I'm not traveled. My wife and I have a rule, you know, we don't spend more than three days apart from each other at any given time of the year. So that's two nights, three days. So what type of job? You know, if they're like, well, this is something with travel, well, where am I going? How long is it going to take to get there? How long is it going to take to get back? Am I going to be all to am I going to miss an acting, you know, performance from one of my daughters or a palm competition or something like that? Because all those things are, you know, my nonnegotiables and everybody kind of has those, but they've changed for me because when I first started out and work life, I wanted to travel all the time. I'm like, dude, I don't care if those some clothes in a delve bag, I'm out. But then, yeah, you're right, things change in what you care about changes and your priorities change. Why do you work? Yeah, I think it goes back to the same stats that throughout there. It goes back to also just thinking about what it takes to be a good dad as well, I think, because, if you think about it, I was thinking about it on the drive over here. I was think about what the hell am I going to talk about? The Dad's all right, and and I was just thinking about like what does it take to be a good dad? And you know, you you have on the obvious, which is spend time with your kids and like be there, but at the same time it's also like you got to set an example for yourself and really like back up what you're saying in terms of advice. So if you're saying, Hey, you know, you could do anything and be anything, like you kind of have to do anything and be anything yourself to like show that to your kids so that so that they can like see your dad succeeding right. Yeah, so I think it's a balance of that, a little bit of you know, why do I go to work? Part of it's just personal challenge, but also it's to set the example, to show, you know, my two sons and daughter like hey, you could start a business and this is a possibility in life. Yeah, definitely, definitely. It's funny. The why is always like the biggest challenge for people, you know, to make sure that the why aligns with the ethos of life, and it's I have a good buddy of mine, Kevin, who that's all. He goes around and talks about like the whole travels the whole world and just talks about like what's your why? And it's hard to figure it out sometimes, to define like okay, why do I really work? Or why do I really, you know, want kids or go to all these performances or, you know, why do I really want a house or any of that kind of stuff? It's a it's a kind of a trippy thing to ask yourself like what is the why of this? kind of its kind of trippy. So if you guys are in the car, you know, driving home from work or driving to work or on a, you know, family trip, think about the why of all the different things, because it kind of messes with your mind a little. You're like it totally message with your mind. Wow, why am I really they like, well, no, I thought it was that, but really it might not be that. That might be just like a superficial answer. Let me dig deeper to that why, and okay, deeper to the wise. It's kind of it is kind of weird. All, we're going to take a quick break, pay some bills and we'll be right back. Now. That to dad's with swag with your host, Shawn, up on some are you tired of swiping on dating APPS, getting catfished when you show up, not wanting to leave the house to meet someone, or just sick of dating the same type of person over and over when you swore this person was different and they turn out to be the same? Contact the date doctor. The date doctor will help you identify your negative dating patterns and help you create new, healthy boundaries and four sessions you will learn proven skills to meet the person who is perfect for you. Make sure you use the dads with Swag Promo Code Swag and get fifty percent off the date doctor. Use Promo Code Swag and get your fifty percent off to find that true love of your life. Welcome back to dad's with swag. Check us out on itunes and please subscribe, rate and review the show. We need all the love we can get. You can find all our past episodes on dad's with swagcom mom, follow us...

...on social media at your coach, Shawn, and if you have any questions or show ideas or you want to come on the show, email me at Sewan, at Sean alfonsocom. All right, we're back in the studio with Brett, but let's get we're going to change the subjects a little bit. Let's get into you know, this is dad's with swag. Let's talk a little dad. Tell me how the relationship with Your Dad has helped you start your own business or model your work life balance, things like that. Yeah, that's interesting. So my dad fortunately just hung out with him for a niner game. Flew back and caught the Vikings and the niners out there. That was cool, and he's actually coming out here for Waste Management. So so that's pretty fun. We've always had a great, great relationship. To be honest, he always was my little league coach. He had his own business growing up, which I was fortunately enough to be like the paper tresice. He jobs, but it's like yes, right, ten years old, watch the fingers, but yeah, like being a part of that environment growing up was huge because, and that's something that I actively try to involve my kids and as well, because the more you involve them in this environment, the more normal it becomes to them, so that, you know, a lot of the times, if you're looking at the way things go in society and in general, you go to school, you go to college, you go get a job and you've kind of got this path right, but it's because that's normal. And the thing that's not normal so much as taking a risk in life and starting a business and like doing these things that you think of but you don't really experience too often. So the more you're involving kids in that, the more normal that becomes in then the less of a bigger risk that is. So I think that I really got that from my dad, you know, growing up and yeah, and fortunately got to be be part of his leadership, you know, as little league teams, so every single little league gear. It's, you know, looking up to him as a coach and seeing him in a different light outside of your family, right, because you get to see him interact with with different kids. So that's something that I've tried to do as well. So coach the warriors as as a basketball coach kind of out of not out of volunteer, but showed up for the team meeting and there was no coach and everyone like went around like, well, I'm not going to be the coach, so I was the last man standing here. Yeah, but that's, you know, a lot of munition for him. Cool. How is your relationship with your dad, other than the Little League coaching and being there for your kids to be able to see firsthand mentorship? What are some other parenting philosophies you've gained from Your Dad, both positive and negative, because I think, and a lot of my listeners agree, going back generational and generational community is one of the things that we're missing in this day and age. Like and especially you're probably feeling it as much as I do. You know, my kids don't have that really close, every day, every you know, couple times a week, connection with their grandparents or with their cousins or with their aunts and uncle's, because we're kind of like out here on an island in Arizona with no immediate family, so there's that huge disconnect. So they don't get that like multigenerational leadership. What are some some parenting philosophies that you've gained from your dad that you were now trying to in still and mimic with you, with your current family. Yeah, that's interesting too, because I've never really been consciously thought of that of like what were his philosophies and how is that influence my parents in philosophy? I guess. You know, you mentioned the negative stuff, like I don't want to share too much about him all, man, this is dad's lack. We have to learn from everything. Yeah, and I think that that's really that. That's it on the head. Is like, you know, learning from mistakes that have happened, you know, throughout fatherhood. So, and you know I mentioned like my parents are divorced. He's been divorced a couple times and, you know, looking at some of those mistakes and learning from that to really serve as motivation to you know, influence your own marriage. I think that's that's really number one. And then number two is also maybe around religion and like I don't know if a lot of listeners, you know, grew up in a really religious type of atmosphere, but I think that there's a whole stretch of the mid s that I have no cultural recollection of in terms of music, of movies, because, you know, grew up in a really religious household where that stuff was not allowed, and then all of a sudden I discovered Tupac and snoop dog and they're him on everything and every everything good in life. That's but I think that's also influenced a bit as well. So in terms of, like, you...

...know, really really focusing on your marriage, because that has a huge impact on your family and your kids as well as the stuff that you expose your kids too. Is probably part of the parents. And Yeah, yeah, that that it's it is true, though, and all my listeners know, especially the people that have been listening for a long time. And if you haven't, go check out some other episodes, an episode that I like a lot and it should be up if I'll double check. If it's not up, I'll throw it up. We have to remember to thank our parents for their fuck ups, like that's important. It's important to say thank you for spanking me, because now I know not to spank my kid, or thank you for locking me out of the house, or thank you for being an alcoholic, or thank you for being a drug addict, because now I've learned. Okay, I don't want to go down that path or I don't want to do that. Some of the biggest pair paranting, at least for me personally, some of the my best parenting philosophies came from my Stepdad's fuck ups. Like I definitely he made a perfect role model of what not to be as a parent. So it really gave me the playbook. When people are like, Oh, kids don't come with playbooks, mine did because I knew exactly what I wasn't going to do and as long as I don't do that stuff, my kids should grow up to be like eighty percent functional in the world. Like I'm like all right, I'm okay. So I didn't have like a what to do book, I just had a what not to do like just don't do that crap and I should be okay. It's funny, like you say, you know, you grown up, you were in such a religious household and all that. I was kind of the opposite. Like my grandparents, everybody in my family had faith. My my grandparents went to church religiously every Sunday, Wednesdays, Tuesdays, like all the time, but my parents never did. I think maybe because their parents did too much. So me growing up, I found a refuge in the church because in the mid S in San Francisco to or a lot of gangs developing and the only one place, like between my school and my grandma's house where, because she would take care of me after school, the only place that gangs didn't hang out was the church. So I'm like, well, Shit, I'm just going to go hang out in that place, and so everything closed, like everything comes out and then I'm going to get back home. So I hung out in the church a lot, like just sitting there doing nothing, because there is never anybody there. It was always nice and quiet. I'm a huge introvert, so like being in this huge church all by myself was kind of chill to me and I wasn't going to get shot, so it was. It was kind of weird how like that was my refuge to get away from like the violence and all that stuff, and then you had that refuge, but then you found gangster rapp and you're like Nice, this is how it's kind of like the opposites me because, yeah, San Francisco's a way different place now. That's so it's a long way from the ladies you know, it's funny. I I talked about this with like so many people and I have a good friend Christina, and you and I talked about her off air. She, you know, was Miss Arizona for a while and she's in broadcasting and you know she does a lot of mental health awareness. Well, she's now. She went from working and broadcasting in Arizona to working in Fresno, like an all Spanish station, which she was really excited about. Well, now she's on channel to and San Francisco. And for years and years I brag about my city. I still brag about my city. Got The niners flag flying, like I rep the bay. My License Plate as SF dubs, like I my my and we go like back generations, like my grandfather on my biological dad side. They have my family put up a plaque at the you know, atnt stadium or whatever the giants stadium is called now in PAC bell I still call it him my head if I don't call it candlestick, but it says like from New York giants to Seal Stadium, candlestick Park to Pack Bell Park, and then it has like my grandfather's name and all that stuff, because he's a die hard, like traveled with the team, you know, move the family across, going back untry or giants like crazy. But I love my city. You know, I've owned many businesses in the city, grew up in the city. I'd love it. It's my home. But I was just talking to my to my friend Christina, how like a shamed I am of my city right now. Like when I was growing up, San Francisco was like the pillar of homelessness, like efforts, like taking care of our less fortunate, taking care of our mentally...

...disabled, taking care of our veterans, taking care of our homeless, like it was you. Yeah, you saw some homeless people around, but they were always well clothed, they were always well fed, you didn't have to worry about it. Like we took great pride and not forgetting those people, and I really love that about the city. I love that about the bay area. And over the last like five or ten years it's just completely gone like downhill, like my my grandmother says, because the neighborhood that she lives in, it started out like as an Italian neighborhood and then it went from Italians to Mexicans, from Mexicans to Tekey's and now she says it's junkies. So she goes. I've gone from the Italians to the Mexicans, to the techy's to the junkies and I haven't moved. I'm like, all right, well, good, more power to you. Let's clean this shit up like, and I'm not sure what it is, you know, is it politics? Is it you know? I have my theories and stuff, but it if anybody and leadership in the Bay's listening, fix the shit. Just fix it. Don't blame it on anybody. Just there's plenty of money, there's not enough space. We might have to move people to Oakland, you know, tear down the boy the warriors aren't going back, the raiders are gone, move the a's, you know, further east or something, and put some affordable housing. San Francisco and Oakland can go in together. They can work in the city with Bart they could work in Oakland and just build huge affordable housing. I don't know for he's got issues. That's what. That's why we got two bay areas. Geez out, it's crazy. I'm like it, but I am I'm very actually kind of ashamed and heartbroken of my hometown, but that's besides the point. So what are some um of the main life lessons that you want to teach your kids, like what are some values and characteristics that you're hoping since they're so small now, you can still mold them? What are some things that you kind of want to mold them to know? Yeah, you know, I wish I had all these answers written down. Maybe all this not. So that's why I see us. It is a trick. I haven't seen the street with Dads what side? None of them. And people who listen religiously, they all know. None of the guests come in with any idea of the question that we're going to ask. And we and this is the cool part about the show, because just like if you're hanging out and you know, a bar wherever with a buddy having a beer, you're going to talk about stuff like this, or maybe not, but hopefully you will. And when you're raw and you're just open, you're like, all right, I've never thought about the philosophies, but let me think if I can think of a few things right now. Take as much time as you need. Yeah, yeah, so philosophies. I think that the the low hanging fruit on that one would just be to go do something that you're passionate about. Like I'm very, very pro discovery in terms of life and I'm not going to say no to too many things. I think that the other thing that I've always I've been grappling with pretty seriously. It is just education in terms of paying for college versus going out and discovering and creating your own education, especially with the the accessibility of information that's that's out there. Right. So, if you take Fiftyzero or whatever it costs for college, good one. Your kids are young, yea pray, Ye, nonexclusive books are housing. Yeah, like, if you take that, and you I mean so, one of my one of my friends, he I don't know if you ever have heard of Peter Teal and how he paid, I think it was about twenty kids a hundred thousand dollars to drop out of college or to Forego College, and this is back in like two thousand and thirteen. I think he's done it every year. It's called the teal fellows, and so three of the first nineteen kids were in Phoenix as part of this group, and so I reached out to all three. I was like, Hey, this is awesome. I'd love to buy you guys a sandwich like this is seven years ago. Took it to the best philly cheese take sandwich you could get and sat down with all three and talk to him about it and I've stayed in touch with them over the years and they've all gone on to do like incredible things, you know, like found companies, like multip billion dollar companies, going back to this hundred thousand dollar investment in them just to say, Hey, you don't have to go to college to get an education. So that's always kind of stuck with me. So in terms of philosophies and like how it just goes back to the path right of like hey, you were trying to equip you as parents with all the information you need to make the best decisions for yourself, and if that...

...best decision for yourself is to Forego College, then great, if it's to go to college and discover it, great, will support you either way. But from a philosophy standpoint, I think it's just it's going back to that root thing that I can't really put a word too, but it's just being like open and paving your own way. Yeah, it's funny because my oldest is a freshman in high school right now and both of my kids go to private school, which is hugely expensive, especially because for me, you know, I grew up in the public school system in San Francisco, which was horrible, and I had a learning disability that, like they're their fix for my learning disability was okay, since he's dyslexic and can't read and write and do math, let's take away his social studies and science and put them in extra English and math classes, where I didn't know what the Hell I was doing anyways. So would like a profustrate. I'm like, are you kidding me? I'm like, if I can't read in first period, how the hell am I going to read and third period? Like it doesn't you should have taken all that away and just put me a music I'm like, come on, you guys are killing me. But so to me, I that was one of the things that I'm like, okay, my parents really fucked up on education with me. I'm going to make sure that you know my kids go to the most academically sound school and all of Arizona, like I, you know, and still people call me a crazy to I get parents called me all the time. Hey, what do you think to school, because I still check out schools all the time. So it's kind of like it's the same thing where it's like, you know, I have friends that are like no, we are going to you know, do like what you're saying, like here's your here's Your College Fund, you know, two hundred and Fiftyzero. You could either take it start a business or you can take it and go to school. The choice is yours. There's no taking it and traveling the world for four years and, you know, blowing it on a Ferrari. It's either you're starting a business and if you know, if you want to find yourself for three to six months, here's five grand. Go Backpack, do it on the cheap whatever. But then it's either go to school or start a career. And I guess none of them have been poor results for these people that have taken the money that I know personally, I'm taking the money and started a small business, and I'm not talking billion dollar businesses, I'm talking small businesses. One is a restaurant and one is a like a tree trimming cut down company, you know, big forest trees and or like big trees in your yard if you need them removed. Tree removal, I guess, would probably be the better explanation for that business. But the one thing that both of them have in common is the fear of failure, like there's no fallback, because if that business doesn't work out, then what are you going to do? Because more and more companies, which I'm totally against, and I don't know why this is even there, but more and more companies won't even look at your resume unless you have an Undergrad won't even look at you know, you can't even get promoted unless you have an MBA or you can. And I'm like, that doesn't make sense, because just because somebody has an MBA doesn't mean they have a strong work ethic, doesn't mean they have the knowledge to do the job, doesn't mean that they have the passion to do the job. They just have this Mba or this college degree. They could have partied for all four years of college, whereas this dude was running a successful business until, you know, maybe the landlord sold the building and they had to move out, or you never know what might have the economy went to shit or something. You know people, at least the guy who owns a business. It's a Mexican restaurant, like people are never going to stop eating. Talk of drinking Tequila. I'm like, you're pretty safe. Like probably the worst the economy gets, the more people are going to eat tacos and drink to Keith let. True, true, tacos and Tequila help a lot of stuff. So it kind of that frustrates me and I think until that changes in corporate America to where that piece of paper or those pieces of paper aren't valued so much, I think more people will forego college and say hey, you know what, why? And it's only a select few of people that are even lucky enough to have the amount of money to to send their kids to college. Most kids that are graduating college are graduating with a hundred fifty thous in debt. So now it's like okay, it's not like I'm starting a business from zero, I'm starting net like negative. Yeah, under way back right. Yeah, like there's my house and my family, like all these things that we aspire for. But I think the safety of having that, at least me as a parent, because my oldest daughter kind of and it's weird, she's gone to such...

...a structure from preschool all the way up to high school, such a structured learning environment. She's a little burnt out on school and she she's really into fashion and all that kind of stuff. So she's like, I think I'm just gonna, you know, go to fit them or whatever it's called, an La, which is like this, it's a really good school and, you know, start a clothing line. And I'm like, okay, that sounds really cool and all, but then if that doesn't work out, what are you going to do? So why not just go to college for four years and then have that fallback that just in case, and then go to fit them then start your clothing line? Like starting it four years later is not going to really, you know, do that much damage to you. But then on the flip side, I'm like, if that's what she's really passionate about, then why not just start college for years later, right? But then you got the kids in a family and all that, and you like, would it be really that easy to go? I don't know, it's a tough one. That is a tough conundrum because you you want your kids to follow their passions and live their lives, but in the same breath you're like, but I want you to be secure and safe. Yeah, yeah, and that's where challenge, that's where it gets tough as a dad, right. You know, I think I value action. Like going back to your question about like the question of why, like what's your why? What's at the core of why do you work? And a lot of people will just like so one of my favorite stories that you mentioned that Ted Talk, was we've visited this goat farm in rural Tennessee funniest story. You guys got to check out this. Do you at? Can you throw out the Ted Talk? You know the title of it, you know, instead of the Ted Talk. Yeah, just Google fainting goat. Okay, Fainting Goat Youtube, and you're going to see videos of these fancing goats, which is at this rural goat farm that we went to and we're interviewing this goat farmer and we're asking her about the goats that she breeds and she breaths panting goats and these are goats that actually faint. They experience fear and they'll literally get a boost of adrenaline and their legs and they can't move and they'll paralyze themselves for about ten seconds and sometimes they'll fall over and so that adrenaline boost subsides and then they're able to walk and whatever. So we didn't believe her. So one of my buddies chased this goat and sure enough, this goat paralyzes and falls over. And what was amazing about this whole thing is that while this is going on, there's like some baby fainting goats that are up against my leg, mezzoling it whatever, you know, and I'm like, why are these goats fainting? And they're like, Oh, well, they haven't learned fear yet, and I'm like that's amazing, like you know. So you think about our kids and you think about all this like, you know, hell blazing stuff that they do, bouncing on couches and like they're fearless, right, and it's not until they go through life and they learn fears that sometimes you get really stuck. And so when you think about you know, man, like why do I work, or like what should I do? Should I should I go to college or should I postpone it for years? Like the thing that I always values just action and just like doing it, because it's very much like Halloween. You can you could put on this costume and if it doesn't fit and it sucks like you can take off that costume and go do something else. Right. So oftentimes it's just like getting in that habit of like not just sitting there paralyzed and being fearful, but it's going out and making stuff happen. Yeah, definitely. And then it's also the experiences, right, because college isn't just about the education. For sure, it's about, you know, the sororities or fraternity's. I didn't do Greek life, but my wife did, and one of my wife's really good friends she is like still gung Ho about her sorority. But those connections, in those conversations that you could have, and I went to a small college in San Francisco. My wife actually went to you of a. So we have a you of a flat fly up here when it's you of a as you games. But my fatherin law he went to Asu and his dad went to Assu and his grandfather went to Asu when it was like the normal school and all this stuff. So they have like lineage and huge athletic boosters and to see like to go to like Asu football games and like be with somebody who knows everybody and you know like really cares about his school's athletic program and you know he can be anywhere in the world and probably bump into a son devil or someone will comment on like oh go Asu, because they see as harsh shirt. It's pretty cool. It's like the same pride I get with like my when I wear my giant's hat. It's like oh go giants. It's like yeah, cool, are you from the bay? It's like automatic conversation starter and I think part of colleges all of that as well,...

...is it's that experience that's a community. It's like the first community that you've actually selected in your life. Yeah, right, because that you go through high school and those those pockets are all weird and then you get to your your selected community and you're they're like in your exp it's a whole new experience. Yeah, and you a whole new chapter in someone's life and you also get to define as well, like kind of how the world's going to see you for a long period of your life, because you know there's a there's a big difference between and I'm not bagging on Asu was just top of mine because I was just talking about it but there's a big difference between somebody meeting a stranger and saying I went to Asu or I went to Stanford. Right. They're going to be like you say you go to Standard Bike, oh you must be a genius. Like Oh, how Super Smart Are you? Like you could have got in on a scholarship. You can be dumb as rocks. You just like know how to shoot a basketball or hit a golf ball, like they have no idea. You know, maybe you're just a really good cheerleader and they needed a cheer leader. I have a buddy of mine who went to USC on a full scholarship just because they needed a drummer and he played, you know, high school marching band drummer, and they needed a drummer. He got a full ride. I'm like, okay, how you're not smart enough to go to as like, what the hell are you talking about? But he was a really good drummer, so full ride. I'm like that's pretty cool, but you get kind of like pigeonholed for a long period of your time. You know, like if I'm going to hire a financial advisor to I want someone who's a Harvard Grad or a Scottsdale Community College Grad. The community college person might be a better investor. For me might be a hustler. Came from nothing, you know, built an empire. The Harvard Grad could have lost the family fortune, but it's still harvard. It's still like, HMM, yeah, you went to horror so it's kind of like that. I don't know. It's like they're picking their community, but they're also picking kind of like an identity for a long period of time. It's kind of a trip, man, it is. It's definitely education out there, even even with the younger education. As you guys are going to find out. It's like, where do your kids go to school? People judge you by that. Like my daughter, my oldest daughter, she does. She loves dance and she's been in dance since she was three and we go to this great dance studio and North Phoenix called diverse elements. But some kids come from different parts of town because this Guy Mario, and also his wife Melissa, both of them amazing hiphop choreographers, and Mario travels a whole world choreographing everybody's hip hop routines. So people from all over the valley go there for hip hop and my daughter loves Mario's hip hop class loves Mario Melissa, but there are other kids that are in her classes, are in her dance company or at her dance competitions, and they find out what school she goes to and they're like, Oh, you go to that rich kids school. So she like came home checked Daddy. I can't go to school there anymore. She goes. People are teasing me. May I'm like hold on, I've heard of getting teased for like being poor or having holes in your shoes like Daddy's. Knows what's been teased about, like going to a smart kids rich kids school. Is Not like you can't be too smart. Should that? They teach me that I go to this smart school and we have so much homework and this that, and I'm like that's not like don't be worried about getting DAS about that. Yeah, I'mlike being teased for being a dummy or a moron. That something you could get like, come to dad and will work on it. But so it's kind of weird that even when, as a parent, you think you're making this great choice for your kids life, I guarantee, but I can't guarantee it, but I'm pretty sure neither one of my kids will ever send their kids to private school. Never they will probably send them to like a school that you can wear your pajamas to. They're like they're proughtly like a uniform. If a school says, oh, your kid has to wear uniform to go here, they'll buy like Nope, no, not happen for sure. All right, we're going to take another quick break and then we'll be right back here in a couple minutes pay some bills. Hey, make sure you guys, when you hear about these people that are sponsoring our show, make sure you guys check them out. All the discounts are legit and everything that we promote here, advertise here on DAD's or swags, I've personally used. I can vouch for the companies. We've had people reach out to us and want us to, you know, put their products up here, talk about their thing, and I've given them their money back, given back their products if I've used some of them and didn't like them. So everything that I talked about here is legit. So go ahead and trust us on this while we pay these bills. All right, guys, I have a way for you to be the hero for the next family vacation or guys tripping. Scottsdale, Arizona, Golf, Spring Training, Barrett Jackson, three hundred and fifty days of fun in the Sun, world famous museums, aquariums and wild life, if and...

...all it takes is one call the GAT. With Gat, you don't have to worry about spending hours on Air BINGB just to show up and the house is a dunk. We've all been all gat homes are personally verified by the owner of Gat. But it doesn't stop there. Gat Can help you with airport, transportation, dinner reservations, Tea Times, recommendations for Family Fund or a night out with the FELLAS. We've all heard about that Scottsdale bottle service. No request is too big or too small. On top of that, you could have Gat do all your grocery shopping so the beer is ice cold and the kids have some snacks asap, so you could jump in a pool asap. So go to girl about town Dot Org now and book your next trip. That will leave you, your friends and family with memories that last a lifetime. Once again, that's girl about town dot o r G. Let Courtney know, dad's with swag sent you and get a six pack and some chips on us. Welcome back to dad's with swag. Check us out on itunes and please subscribe, rate and review the show. We need all the love we can get. You can find all our past episodes on Dad's with swagcom. Follow us on social media at your coach, Shawn, and if you have any questions or show ideas or you want to come on the show, email me at Sewan, at Sewan alfonsocom. All Right, welcome back to DAD's would swag. I want. We're going to completely change it now from like schools and deep, deep conversation chicken farming. How does one become a backyard chicken farmer? You build a coup. You build a coup. It's that, I see. He doesn't joke. Take Action, right, just take action, just keep moving, you build the coup. Yeah, yeah, I could. So you're probably your question is probably why, like why have a house in Old Town Scott still with chickens? The story with it was my son was born, I wanted to teach him about entrepreneurship, wanted him to have his first business at I think it was age two, and so decided to get five chickens, which became eight chickens, so that he would have inventory of eggs to go sell to neighbors and we would have these great organic eggs. So that's how it happened. My uncle flew down from Snowma county, we built a chicken coup and about four days got those chickens and then my son started selling Braylan's eggs around the hood for five bucks. He he learned all about making change and keeping customers happy branding. He'd printed out little business cars. I've always color the little boxes and stuff. Yeah, and the chickens are still there now. For years into it. It's not that great of an idea, but in you're one and two is it was popping. Yeah, that's cool. It's funny because my wife would love to have some chickens here in our backyard. We've already had we already have desert tortoises and dogs and she would love to have some chickens and we've kind of thought about it, but then we're like, okay, is it going to be like cool for a while and we're going to eat all these eggs and have all these fresh eggs, but then like what if we go out of town and there's no one to get the egg and who's going to eat all two eggs? I'm like I and to our my oldest daughter is, I think she's Vegan, like I think she was just born Vegan. She doesn't like eggs or milk or cheese or meat or anything that comes from an animal, which is weird because we're carnivore family. Like we've never talked about any of that stuff. But from birth, like she's just never like I'm not drinking that cow's milk. Like all right, what milk you'll drink? Well, I'm not going to drink any milk, I'll have water. I'm like. I find she eats her cereal dry like just it's weird. But she does eat ice cream, so I'm gonna have to bring that up to her. But she does actually eat a lot of otter POPs to which is weird. Not as much ice cream, but from the bad love it's it's. So we always have a real it's on hand, so she eats those sometimes too. That has dairy in it. But okay, I digress. She doesn't eat any eggs. Got That pretty much leaves like myself and my wife and I'm divorced from my first marriage, so the girls are only here part time, so sometimes it's just Megan and I and we're like all right. I'm like, baby, we can't eat that many eggs. Like what're gonna do all these eggs? But selling them is a good idea. Bees are also another thing that I kind of would like to get like a little bee. No, man, and I'm completely terrified I getting stung. But you like you kind of see like how good they are for the environment and like where we live there's a bunch of trees and things that need this pollenization. I could be kind of cool because we like on the back of our property, got a little extra landed. Be Nice that like some chickens and like little bee hive there. But I don't know. Sure that's...

...all. Yeah, I bet. Yeah, but I heard the honey bees are a little bit more tame. Well, I'm not sure, maybe not, I don't know, but if you keep like the quick I did some youtubeing, which does I don't know, like my brother learned so much shit from Youtube. I learned nothing. Unlike the add kicks in. I'm like halfway in to be farming, like this is going to be awesome, but I didn't get down to like the negative part of it. I'm just going to get a queen and throw it in this box. It'll be great. Get some honey. Like I'm like eppy pain all over myself from getting stung so much. So the net here's another cool thing. I want to jump into the World Pillow Fighting Championship, and I'm it's funny like how I'm gonna have to text Christina because she's all over this episode. My friend Christina that now lives in the bay. I don't know if she's heard about this or whatever, but I was kind of one day just kind of going through her instagram, like instagram stories or something. I was sitting on the couch and she had mentioned something about could somebody open up a pillow fighting gym, but I was like I'm not listening to this. I kept scrolling, you know, as you kind of doing people's stories, but then I was reading your thing. I'm like what Sonoma Pillow Fighting Championship? I'm like I wonder if Christina was talking about this and wants this to happen all the time. So she wants a pillow fighting gym, but I have no idea. So I got to hit her up and like me find out what she meant by pillow fighting. So tell us a little bit about the World Pillow Fighting Championship. Definitely Nice. Yeah, you heard here first, unless you want to just,...

...you know, go on the fourth of July the Sonoma County and find out where this park's at and throw a pole. They're kind of watched a little bit on the website. When to the website and kind of read the history and stuff like that. Yeah, yeah, it's really fun. The only recommendation that I can make looking at the website is to work up. Maybe it looked like cup is definitely required, some town lotion in a cup. That's cool, though, because I think that, like you know, that's that's something that can really help bring, like you said, the community together. I know in Sam Bruno, which is a neighborhood that I lived in for a long time, my brother and I kind of did the same thing, not with pillow fighting, but we had a devastating fire and Sam Brno where Pgini, which, for people not from northern California, is our gas company. It just a pipe exploded like blew up forty homes, just like within a second and some of those were some of our closest friends homes and stuff, and we put together a big free concert in Sambreno Park and it's those kind of things that really bring the community together after a tragedy like that. So check it out. Two Thousand and twenty one the World Pedal Fighting Championship. I definitely have a reporter in the bay area that would love to cover the story. Yeah, I'm pretty sure. I don't know what she was going through where she wanted to open a pillow fighting gym, but definitely she'll probably love to cover the world pillow fighting championship. Thanks for coming down, man with really appreciate Avenue on live in the studio with Dad's would swag. If you guys have some aggression or charitable you know giving you want to do, hit up the world pillow fighting championship. If you have a small business or coming up with the small business, make sure you guys get your Seo at marketers. Ask for Brett and I found Brett, is funny story, through a modeling friend of wife. He's who pets. It's our dogs, so I know he hires really cool employees. So that's he. I can vouch for that because I let her take care of my house and my dogs, and you guys know how important the pups are to our family. So check out marketers asked for Brett. We got the World Pillow Fighting Championship coming in two thousand and twenty one. Or if you you know, need any tips on chicken farming, you can call Brett at the office and ask him some chicken farming questions. Or if you want to buy some eggs and the local Old Town Scottsdale area, or you know, if you live up in silverly for something, you want some really good organic eggs, you can drive down to Old Town Scottsdale and Brett son would love to sell you some organic eggs. Thanks a lot for being on a show. We really appreciate it. You got it and we out. Thanks for listening to DAD's swag. Check out new episodes every Thursday or go to dad's for swagcom download past episodes.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (33)